When it comes to approaches, indeed in the plural, on the migration issue, there tends to be a lack of differentiation... “migrants, refugees, displaced persons”…

At a time when some in Europe are appropriating the political field and the media with "discriminatory comments" on "migrants", some men and women express themselves differently.

You’d think that diplomats were bored when there was no migration. What were our representatives abroad doing before the migration era? Some would say, however, that migration is a human matter, from time immemorial, since man is man. Man is a migrant, in migration, by nature. It’s ontological. Migrating is simply living, that’s what we say at Josefa

To date, the news in the Middle East, the influx of migrants on European, especially Italian, shores, and in Calais, the growing diversity in the population of European cities, like Brussels, these are situations, among many others, that call for a change in our perception of migration and migration flows, particularly in Europe...

Albert Camus reminds us that apart from a few holy exceptions, in each of us lies a little Meursault, "The Stranger". We can certainly identify ourselves, tell our story through a résumé, a LinkedIn profile, a Web page, a blog, or even an expression, the result of a long psychotherapy or of another resilient life path, but would we really be able to relate our share of strangeness, our share of difference, our share of uniqueness, that have taken refuge inside ourselves?

Welcoming the foreigner: is this a duty, a constraint, a charitable gesture or a superhuman effort? In light of some of the feedback we received after the launch of our website, it is worth asking the question.

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